Literature:Classics

Literature:Classics

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1 Ibsen, Henrik; Archer, William (edited by) The League of Youth; the Pillars of Society; a Doll's House Authorised Translation
Ibsen is generally acknowledged as the founder of modern prose drama. He moved away from the Romantic style, and brought the real problems and ideas of the day onto the stage of his time. Ibsen wrote for and about the middle class and life in small towns. He focused on characters and psychological conflicts rather than dramatic situations. His central theme was the duty of the individual towards himself. Pillars of Society (1877) deals with a wealthy and hypocritical businessman whose dangerous course almost results in the death of his son. A Doll´s House (1879) is a social drama, which caused a sensation at the time and toured Europe and America. In the play a woman refuses to obey her husband and walks out from her apparently perfect marriage, her life in the "doll's house". This play has been presented several times in movies and television. 389 pages with an additional 20 pages of ads. This book was clearly owned by an Ibsen fan, as there are several loose newspaper clippings from the late 1800s about his works included. A photograph of Ibsen is included in the inside cover, and an article is pasted down on the ffep, with another on the recto of the last page. The binding is loose, with light wear at the corners and moderate wear at the spine ends. The spine has a vertical rub. 5" x 7 1/2" tall
Walter Scott
London, 1897, Second Edition
Hardcover
Good


003342; 
Price: 12.88 USD
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2 Longfellow, H. W. ; Scudder, H. S. (edited by) Evangeline a Tale of Acadie
This is book 1 of the Riverside Literature Series; it includes a biographical sketch, introduction and notes by H. E. Scudder, and a sketch of Longfellow's home life by his daughter, Alice M. Longfellow. It is a story of loss and devotion set against the deportation of the Acadian people. The British expelled those who were French-speaking, living in Nova Scotia. The poem elevated Longfellow to the most famous writer in America and has had a lasting cultural impact, especially in Nova Scotia and Louisiana, where most of the poem is set. Longfellow conceived the subject for this poem when he invited a few friends to dine at his home Cambridge. A guest told of a story he heard from a French-Canadian woman about an Acadian couple separated on their wedding day by this explusion. The bride-to-be wandered for years, trying to find her fiancé. Longfellow was intrigued, and reportedly called the story, "the best illustration of faithfulness and the constancy of woman that I have ever heard of or read. " These volumes are stapled with stiff paper boards. 104 pages including a pronunciation vocabulary and lists of other books available. The frontis piece has a 1" tear at the top; a pen mark at the bottom of two pages, and there is a 1/2" oval area on the last page missing. Illustrated.
Houghton Mifflin Company; The Riverside Press Cambridge
New York, 1896, 
Softcover
Very Good


003323; 
Price: 14.72 USD
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